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Delaware "Sahara": Tunisian Fulbright Scholar studying beneficial bacteria for legumes

Delaware "Sahara": Tunisian Fulbright Scholar studying beneficial bacteria for legumes

At first glance, it wouldn’t seem like Delaware and the Sahara Desert have a lot in common. However, on closer inspection, the mid-Atlantic state and the arid regions of southern Tunisia in Africa are more similar than they first appear. That is one reason why Mokhtar Rejili, a professor from the University of Gabes in Tunisia, is excited to be at the University of Delaware on a Fulbright Scholarship working with UD's Janine Sherrier on the study of legumes native to his home country.

Of the similarities between the two seemingly disparate locations, Sherrier, a professor in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences in UD's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, explained that Delaware has sandy soil and shoreline salt stress. "Our sandy soils dry out very rapidly and our crop plants can be subject to salt stress. There are also common stresses experienced by plants grown in the two locations, albeit to different levels of severity,” she said.

The scientists are collaborating on research to identify beneficial bacteria to help the plants grow more successfully under conditions of drought and salt stress. Rejili specifically studies legumes that grow in conditions of extreme drought and severe salt stress, and his Tunisian team identifies bacteria that interact with the plant roots growing on the outskirts of the Sahara.