delware environmental institute

IN THE NEWS

Environmental news from Delaware and the surrounding region.

UDaily: UD researcher Jaclyn Smolinsky uses weather radar to find migratory bird hot spots
01/15/2016 -

Working at a bird banding station in Louisiana catching birds coming across the Gulf of Mexico, Jaclyn Smolinsky remembers one day leaving a site where they caught 300 to 400 birds and looking up at a tree where birds had chosen to rest and thinking that it looked like a Christmas tree.

UDaily: UD researchers evaluate how coral-seaweed interactions affect coral associated reef fishes
01/15/2016 -

A new study by the University of Delaware’s Danielle Dixson and Rohan Brooker has shown that butterflyfishes avoid coral that has come in contact with seaweed. The paper, which appeared this week in the Nature publication Scientific Reports, is the first to critically evaluate the impact coral-seaweed interactions will have on coral associated reef fishes, a key component of coral reef resilience.

UDaily: UD study seeks to better understand foraging competition between Adelie, gentoo penguins
01/15/2016 -

For hundreds of years, Adélie penguins have been breeding in the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), which has recently become one of the most rapidly warming areas on Earth. At Palmer Station, a U.S. research base located along the WAP, scientists have been monitoring Adélie penguin population declines for decades. There were 15,000 breeding pairs of Adélie penguins in 1975; but today only a few thousand pairs are left.

01/15/2016 -

If December seemed warmer that usual, that's because it was. And by a wide margin. Wilmington just recorded its warmest December on record with an average temperature of 49.4 degrees, nearly 7 degrees warmer than the old record of December 2001, when the average temperature was 42.5 degrees.

UDaily: UD research may lead to new control for devastating rice fungus
01/15/2016 -

In a “clash of the microbes,” University of Delaware plant scientists are uncovering more clues critical to disarming a fungus that is the number one killer of rice plants. The findings, published in December in Frontiers in Plant Science and in Current Opinion in Plant Biology, may lead to a more effective control for Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungus that causes rice blast disease.

UDaily: Paper estimates widespread tree death in Southwestern forests under global warming scenarios
01/15/2016 -

A research paper published today in Nature Climate Change predicts widespread death of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within the Southwest United States by the year 2100 under projected global warming scenarios. The research team that conducted the study, which includes University of Delaware’s Sara Rauscher, considered both field results and a range of validated regional predictions and global simulation models of varying complexity, in reaching this grim conclusion.

01/15/2016 -

While the recent Paris summit helped move global leaders onto the same page on climate change, the next step is figuring out exactly how to cut down on greenhouse gas emissions. The federal government has spent millions of dollars to fund research and technology to create algae-based biofuel and scientists are starting to make headway toward making it competitive when it comes to cost.

01/15/2016 -

Last weekend in Paris, delegates from 195 nations came together and pledged to cut global greenhouse gas emissions. They decided on an ambitious goal - limiting global average temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. Reaching such a goal could go a long way toward making progress on mitigating some consequences of climate change, such as sea level rise, extreme heat and drought. University of Delaware professor of energy and climate policy John Byrne was among the experts who attended the climate summit. This week, he discussed his experience in Paris and this new agreement with Delaware Public Media’s science reporter Eli Chen.

01/15/2016 -

Unlike some other places across the country, most notably California, Delaware is not dealing with a water supply issue. Data shows little decline in the stockpile of water stored in the layer cake of aquifers that lie beneath the state. In many cases, that water is millions of years old, laid down amid the sands and sediments of geologic epochs.

UDaily: Paper estimates widespread tree death in Southwestern forests under global warming scenarios
12/22/2015 -

research paper published today in Nature Climate Changepredicts widespread death of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within the Southwest United States by the year 2100 under projected global warming scenarios.

The research team that conducted the study, which includes University of Delaware’s Sara Rauscher, considered both field results and a range of validated regional predictions and global simulation models of varying complexity, in reaching this grim conclusion.