delware environmental institute


Environmental news from Delaware and the surrounding region.

UDaily: UD researchers examine ways to break down, track synthetic compound in herbicides
03/22/2016 -

To examine the fate and persistence of glyphosate, one of the most common commercial herbicides used for agricultural and urban applications, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), a major byproduct of glyphosate, in soils and other environments, researchers at the University of Delaware have used isotopic signatures as a method of source tracking.

The research involves the use of manganese oxide minerals to break down glyphosate and to identify released phosphate and other byproducts such as AMPA. The researchers used oxygen isotopes of released phosphate from glyphosate and compared that from other phosphorous compounds present in soils and other environments with an aim to discriminate and track the sources. 

UDaily: Symposium to honor Benjamin Franklin laureate in earth, environmental science
03/18/2016 -

On Wednesday, April 20, the University of Delaware will host “Rising Seas and Extreme Events on Vulnerable Coasts,” a symposium honoring UD alumnus Brian F. Atwater, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey and the recipient of the Franklin Institute’s 2016 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Earth and Environmental Science.

The symposium, set for 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Trabant University Center Multipurpose Rooms, is free and open to the public. 

To register for the symposium, or submit to the call for posters, click here.

UDaily: DENIN Ambassadors host screening of 'Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story'
03/08/2016 -

The Delaware Environmental Institute (DENIN) Ambassadors student group will host a free screening of the film Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story at 7 p.m., Monday, March 14, in the Harker Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Laboratory atrium.

Just Eat It looks at systemic obsessions with expiration dates, perfect produce and portion sizes and reveals the core of an issue that is having devastating consequences around the globe as nearly half of our food is thrown in the trash.

03/08/2016 -

The Blue Hen Economics Club will hold four information sessions for University of Delaware students interested in participating in its second annual UD Environmental Case Competition.

The information sessions will take place at 7 p.m. on March 9 in 229 Purnell Hall, March 10 in 116 Purnell Hall, March 16 in 204 Gore Hall and March 17 in 116 Purnell Hall.

The UD Environmental Case Competition allows students to present their ideas for making the campus more sustainable. Individuals or teams of students research the issue and make the case for a potential solution to the problem.

03/03/2016 -

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) at the University of Delaware has signed an agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to become a data provider for the National Ground-Water Monitoring Network (NGWMN).

UDaily: Lunchtime lecture to feature UD pioneer in vehicle-to-grid technology
03/03/2016 -

The first installment of this semester’s University of Delaware Green Liaisons Sustainability Lecture Series, featuring UD professor and researcher Willett Kempton, will be held from noon-1 p.m., Friday, March 4, in the Perkins Student Center Alumni Lounge.

Kempton will share the latest news regarding the vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology that he helped to spearhead. 

V2G technology is an innovation of renewable energy research that enables electric vehicles to communicate with the electric grid in order to recycle stored battery power.

UDaily: UD professor studies how Arctic soils are affected by precipitation, mainly snow
03/03/2016 -

Neil Sturchio, professor and chair of the University of Delaware’s Department of Geological Sciences, is exploring how the thawing of permafrost, a subsurface layer of soil that remains mostly frozen throughout the year, affects vegetation and the carbon cycle in the Toolik Lake area of the Alaska’s North Slope. 

“There is a lot of carbon frozen in the Arctic soil’s permafrost layer. If this all thaws out, prevailing thought is that the carbon in the soil could be released to the atmosphere and potentially accelerate global warming,” said Sturchio.

02/28/2016 -

The worsening of tidal flooding in American coastal communities is largely a consequence of greenhouse gases from human activity, and the problem will grow far worse in coming decades, scientists reported Monday. Those emissions, primarily from the burning of fossil fuels, are causing the ocean to rise at the fastest rate since at least the founding of ancient Rome, the scientists said. They added that in the absence of human emissions, the ocean surface would be rising less rapidly and might even be falling.

UDaily: UD's Philadelphia Flower Show exhibit features natural beauty of science trail
02/28/2016 -

The Pacific Crest Trail, a West Coast counterpart to the Appalachian Trail, stretches 2,600 miles from the Mexican to the Canadian border, spanning terrain that ranges from deserts to snow-topped mountains, bare lava fields to thick evergreen forests. Hikers might spend half a year covering its length, but a group of University of Delaware students is hard at work on a different kind of challenge — distilling the essence of the trail into a 23-by-33-foot exhibit that visitors to the Philadelphia Flower Show can experience in just a few minutes.

02/28/2016 -

Massive flocks of snow geese honking overhead, gliding onto farm fields and feeding in tidal marshes have been a sign of winter in Delaware for more than three decades. But not this year.