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IN THE NEWS

Environmental news from Delaware and the surrounding region.

UDaily: University Library hosts exhibition on "Legacy of the Delaware Coastal Zone Act"
01/26/2015 -

The University of Delaware Library has announced a forthcoming new exhibition, “The Legacy of the Delaware Coastal Zone Act: Conserving the First State,” which will be on view from Tuesday, Jan. 27, through Friday, July 3, in the Information Room on the first floor in the Morris Library. The Coastal Zone Act, signed in 1971 by Gov. Russell Peterson, is widely considered to be the most important -- and one of the most contentious -- piece of environmental legislation ever passed in Delaware.

01/26/2015 -

There are glitzier beaches in America, but most are not nearly as pristine as Delaware’s Rehoboth Beach, where the water quality is routinely ranked among the nation’s best. But the same can’t be said for dirty Rehoboth Bay, separated from the popular ocean beach by a sliver of coastal highway. For decades, wastewater treated at a nearby sewer facility has been dumped into a canal that runs to the bay. A court has ordered it to stop.

01/26/2015 -

It used to be that scientists assumed there wasn't much stirring in the chilly Arctic waters beyond Norway's North Pole during winter. It is dark 24 hours a day, frozen and cold. But that assumption turned out to be wrong once scientists like Mark Moline, director of the University of Delaware's School of Marine Policy, started taking a closer look at what was happening in the near shore waters of the village of Ny-Alesund beginning in the winter of 2010.

UDaily: UD's Vargas part of United Nations publication on benefits of soil carbon
01/21/2015 -

The University of Delaware’s Rodrigo Vargas is part of an international team of researchers who have identified advances on the benefits of soil carbon in an effort to address serious environmental challenges affecting millions of people around the globe. Their findings were released on World Soil Day last month in Volume 71 of the United Nations’ Scientific Committee for Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) series titled “Soil Carbon: Science, Management and Policy for Multiple Benefits,” which was published by the intergovernmental scientific research organization CABI.

UDaily: New technology enables advanced analysis of zooplankton, marine organisms
01/15/2015 -

University of Delaware researcher Jonathan Cohen is using a new technology to analyze and quantify zooplankton in the Delaware Bay. Zooplankton are millimeter to centimeter scale organisms that live in water. A diverse and ecologically significant group of animals, they range in size from small copepods the size of a grain of rice to large jellyfish.

UDaily: A tale of two poles
01/15/2015 -

Researchers from the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment are conducting research at opposite ends of the globe this month. Check in here for the latest installments in a continuing series or follow their journeys on social media at #UDPolar.

01/15/2015 -

A team of researchers at the University of Delaware’s Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) recently invented the Quantitative Carbon Detector (QCD), a new device that identifies and quantifies chemical compounds in complex mixtures such as fuels, oils, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and food. This instrument will have a significant impact on the amount of time required for chemical analysis.

01/09/2015 -

From common urban pigeons to two majestic bald eagles perched in a tree at Hoopes Reservoir, every bird mattered Saturday when a team of volunteers went out to assess winter bird populations in a habitat-rich area of northwest Wilmington. Since Dec. 14, other teams have canvased 15-mile-wide diameter circles throughout Delaware as part of the Audubon Christmas Bird Count. The idea: to get a snapshot of wintering bird populations.

01/09/2015 -

In the undersea world of oceans, bays and estuaries, they are the fish that we rarely think of or even see: Atlantic silverside minnows, bay, silver and striped anchovies and sand eels. But it is these little fish that fuel the food chain all the way up to giant sharks, blue fin tunas, striped bass, bluefish and mackerels.

01/09/2015 -

By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas – including dozens of cities – are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise. That’s according to a study published December 18 in Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.