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IN THE NEWS

Environmental news from Delaware and the surrounding region.

UDaily: Institute for Global Studies invites campus to cool down with Arctic-themed programs during April
04/06/2016 -

Throughout the month of April, the University of Delaware will discover the science, history and culture of Arctic communities and landscapes while honoring UD’s commitment to research and impact in this, the vast northernmost region of the world. Arctic Month, hosted by the Institute for Global Studies, will feature more than a dozen lectures, programs and events on topics ranging from marine biosciences in the depths of the Arctic Ocean to modern-day Inuit interpretations of long-passed traditions.

UDaily: UD faculty to lead international conference on impacts of extreme climate events
04/05/2016 -

An international conference on the impacts of extreme climate events on aquatic biogeochemical cycles and fluxes will be convened by a group that includes two faculty members in the University of Delaware’s Department of Plant and Soil Sciences from Jan. 22-27, 2017, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

The special meeting -- which is being organized in part by Shreeram Inamdar, professor of plant and soil sciences, and Thomas Parr, a postdoctoral scientist in the department -- has been selected as an American Geophysical Union (AGU) Chapman Conference. 

UDaily: UD's Earth Month celebration features festival, films, talks, Green Expo
04/04/2016 -

After months of planning by students, faculty and staff, this is what it all comes down to: The University of Delaware’s Earth Month celebration aims to draw attention to issues of environmental sustainability and environmental justice. The schedule of events is available on the Earth Month 2016 webpage, compiled by the Earth Month Working Group of the University’s Sustainability Task Force.

Officially, Earth Day is Friday, April 22, but events are planned throughout the month.

“This year we had the added bonus of working with staff from the Institute for Global Studies, who had designated April as Arctic Month,” said Katie Morrison, assistant director in Residence Life and Housing and co-chair of the Sustainability Task Force. “The two observances dovetail nicely and our coordination has resulted in an especially rich schedule of Earth-related events throughout the month.”

Highlights include the third annual Lights, Camera, EARTH! film festival, which begins at 3 p.m., Friday, April 8, and continues through Sunday evening, April 10. The festival features six films on the theme of climate change, each followed by a faculty-led discussion. 

04/01/2016 -

Leading by example can be a catalyst for progress, which is why “Be the Change” is the theme for the fourth annual student video competition sponsored by the Delaware Environmental Institute (DENIN). The DENIN Ambassadors student group is organizing the contest during the month of April — Earth Month at UD. This year, the competition will be a social media event, and all UD undergraduate students are invited to participate.

UDaily: Renowned scientist Walter Munk, "Einstein of the Oceans," to speak at UD
04/01/2016 -

Renowned oceanographer Walter Munk will discuss his more than 75 years of scientific discovery and research in ocean sciences, ocean sound transmission and climate change, during a special guest lecture on Monday, April 25. Hosted by University of Delaware’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, the event will take place from 4:30-6 p.m. in Mitchell Hall.UD Acting President Nancy Targett will kick off the evening by welcoming Munk — considered by many to be “the Einstein of the Oceans” — to campus.

03/31/2016 -

At 20 locations in Delaware since 2012, drinking water tests revealed lead levels above the federally set threshold of 15 parts per billion. State officials don't believe this signals a reason for alarm because failed tests are fairly commonplace; what they are concerned about is the response that follows.

UDaily: Fuel-cell technology provides new approach to energy-efficient heating and refrigeration
03/31/2016 -

Fuel cell technology has attracted a lot of attention recently for its potential to revolutionize the transportation sector by decreasing our use of fossil fuels and reducing emissions that contribute to climate change. But it turns out that the same technology can also be used in heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) applications, which account for about half of the energy use in a typical U.S. home.

03/31/2016 -

The Obama administration announcement Tuesday that it will bar oil drilling in the Atlantic Ocean was cheered by Delaware politicians and environmental activists. John Doerfler, chair of the nonprofit Surfrider Foundation's Delaware chapter, said the administration's decision will benefit the state's economy  by keeping its tourism industry intact.

03/31/2016 -

A new study by the University of Delaware's Special Initiative on Offshore Wind (SIOW) reports that a commitment by Massachusetts to develop offshore wind (OSW) energy at a scale of 2,000 MW, combined with ongoing technology and industry advances, will lower previously projected costs for the clean energy source by as much as 55 percent in the next decade. That kind of cost reduction, driven by market forces, will put offshore wind on a clear path to deliver clean power at competitive prices for millions of ratepayers in the Boston area and beyond, and make the renewable resource a key contributor to the state's clean energy future.

UDaily: AgVISE determining best way to set cost-share rates for farmers' conservation work
03/31/2016 -

Imagine if Priceline or eBay took over U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs and farmers could set their own prices for conservation efforts. Four hundred farmers had the chance to do just that in 2014 through the University of Delaware’s Agricultural Values, Innovation, and Stewardship Enhancement (AgVISE) project. AgVISE is a research project that gives farmers the opportunity to set their own cost-share amounts for voluntary nutrient management practices rather than the government setting what they should pay.