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UDaily: UD researchers mentor early career scientists on using robotics to maximize field work at sea

UDaily: UD researchers mentor early career scientists on using robotics to maximize field work at sea

Nine early career marine scientists from institutions across the nation spent seven days aboard the University of Delaware’s R/V Hugh R. Sharp training to become chief scientists and to use robotics to maximize research opportunities at sea. The R/V Hugh R. Sharp, UD’s 146-foot, state-of-the-art coastal research vessel, is a member of the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS). The early career scientists represented Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Dartmouth and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), among other institutions.

The UNOLS Chief Scientist Training Cruise, held Nov. 17-23 and sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research, was designed to instruct early career marine scientists, including doctoral students, faculty and researchers, on how to effectively plan for — and lead — fieldwork at sea for multi-disciplinary research and education.

Using robotic and autonomous systems aboard UNOLS vessels is increasing and these systems require additional consideration in mission planning, deployment, monitoring, recovery and communications, beyond traditional shipboard operations.