Students In Action

In November 2018 the Delaware Environmental Institute Ambassadors hosted a panel discussion about the latest reports from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change—Global Warming of 1.5℃. The Ambassadors are a group of environmental …

Maggie Capooci found her calling in the salt marshes of Georgia and Louisiana during an undergraduate field trip for an estuary ecology class at the University of Scranton. Her love was confirmed during a summer research fellowship at Woods Hole Oceano …

“If we know more about the interactions between soil minerals and organic matter, we can begin to answer so many other questions, like how are essential nutrients such as dissolved organic carbon, phosphorus, and nitrogen transported and cycled into th …

I’d never before thought of concrete as a substance containing living organisms, but Anders Kiledal, a UD Ph.D. student and DENIN Environmental Fellow, tells me it does. He is analyzing the kinds and communities of bacteria in concrete. Repairing and r …

“Biochar is seeing wide use these days, but it’s viewed as almost a magic powder,” says Danhui Xin, DENIN Environmental Fellow and Ph.D. student. Her research aims to increase the scientific understanding behind why and how biochar works. Biochar is a …

Did you know that microbiologists and engineers have been working for several years to harvest plastics from bacteria in wastewater sludge? Now Xiangmin Liang, a UD Ph.D. student and DENIN Environmental Fellow, is trying to make the plastics stronger.

Eric Moore’s research asks what urban forests will look like in 2050 or 2100 if we do nothing about nonnative invasive plants. What if no trees sprout to replace current urban forests?

As an undergraduate at the University of Montana, Amanda Rosier studied oil-degrading bacteria. “Microorganisms are so powerful in helping us solve human-made problems,” she said. “There’s so much we don’t know about them. It’s like a whole frontier of …

Kyra Kim is at the beach again, but her Ph.D. advisor won’t mind. Kim’s research is among the first to explore the biochemistry of the wet sand zone on beaches.